Cooking

How to cook butternut squash?

To carefully remove the skin, use a sharp knife (or a sturdy vegetable peeler). In contrast, the skin can be left on because it tastes good when roasted! However, remove and discard if added to a soup (or other preparation) where it won't be roasted. Use an ice cream scoop or spoon to remove any seeds.

 

The bell-shaped butternut squash, along with other well-known types of winter squash, acorn, kabocha, and pumpkins, is arguably the most popular in the UK. It is a popular option because of its yellowish-beige skin and vibrant orange flesh, and its adaptable rich, buttery, and slightly nutty flavor is utilized in both sweet and savory recipes.

Observations to make when purchasing butternut squash

Although butternut squash is available year-round in stores, the UK season lasts from September to December, therefore it is best to purchase British. Choose firm squash with long necks so there is more meat and less seed cavity. Stay away from squash with pitted skin.

Preparing butternut squash

Before cooking, butternut squash must have the skin, seeds, and fibrous membrane removed. Although the meat can be used, the seeds can be consumed after being gently toasted. To prepare, take a sharp knife to chop off the top and bottom. Next, peel the skin using a vegetable peeler (unless you’re baking it whole, in which case leave the skin on). Chop the meat in accordance with the directions in your recipe after scooping away the seeds and fibrous membrane.

Squash is frequently prepared by roasting in the oven, seasoning with salt, wrapping in foil, and baking for 20 to 30 minutes at 180C/gas mark 6. Cook the squash for a further 10 minutes to purée it.

What Squash Pairs Well With

The excellent flavour of butternut squash lends itself nicely to velvety soup since it is potent enough to support a meal on its own. Butternut pairs well with meat, notably duck, deer, and rabbit when roasted or puréed, while salty cheeses like feta or Parmesan balance out its sweetness.

It’s frequently used to flavor risotto, add flavor to ravioli with sage and scorched butter, or load it with rice and bake it whole. It’s the perfect filling for an autumnal pie when flavored with cinnamon or nutmeg.

Hassan Rajput

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